Song of Hiawatha

In my article of a month ago, I wrote of my beloved uncle. He introduced me to the world of poetry in all its portrayals of love, poverty, laughter, and despair. I also included two poems from the poetry book The Thousand Best Poems In the World.

I would now like to introduce a beloved poem that is world famous. The Song of Hiawatha. This poem was and still is among my favorites. It is in Wikipedia and also in the above book.

Hiawatha

The Song of Hiawatha

On the shores of Gitche Gumee,
Of the shining Big-Sea-Water,
Stood Nokomis, the old woman,
Pointing with her finger westward,
O’er the water pointing westward,
To the purple clouds of sunset.
Fiercely the red sun descending
Burned his way along the heavens,
Set the sky on fire behind him,

As war-parties, when retreating,
Burn the prairies on their war trail;
And the moon, the Night-sun, eastward,
Suddenly starting from his ambush,
Followed fast those bloody footprints,
Followed in that fiery war-trail,

With its glare upon his features.
And Nokomis, the old woman,
Pointing with her finger westward,
Spake these words to Hiawatha:
“Yonder dwells the great Pearl-Feather,
Megissogwon, the Magician,
Manito of Wealth and Wampum,
Guarded by his fiery serpents,
Guarded by the black pitch-water.
You can see his fiery serpents,
The Kenabeek, the great serpents,
Coiling, playing in the water;
You can see the black pitch-water
Stretching far away beyond them,
To the purple clouds of sunset!
“He it was who slew my father,
By his wicked wiles and cunning,
When he from the moon descended,
When he came on earth to seek me.
He, the mightiest of Magicians,
Sends the fever from the marshes,
Sends the pestilential vapors,
Sends the poisonous exhalations,
Sends the white fog from the fen-lands,
Sends disease and death among us!
“Take your bow, O Hiawatha,
Take your arrows, jasper-headed,
Take your war club, Puggawaugun,
And your mittens, Minjekahwun,
And your birch canoe for sailing,
And the oil of Mishe-Nahma,
So to smear its sides, that swiftly
You may pass the black pitch-water;
Slay this merciless magician,
Save the people from the fever
That he breathes across the fen-lands,
And avenge my father’s murder!”………..

The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, American poet (1807-1882)

Longfellow

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Thousand Best Poems in the World
Selected and Arranged by E.W. Cole
London
Hutchinson & Co.9 Publishers) Ltd.
Paternoster Row. F.C.
Melbourne: Coles Book Arcade

In next month’s article, I would like to introduce poetry that centers on the poverty, love, and history of Victorian times in the U.K.

Looking for books and bundles by Authors’ Billboard authors? Click here.

 

Poetry Stirs The Heart by @KatyWalters07

Many years ago, I was given a book of Poetry published around 1900. My uncle cherished this precious volume and safely guarded it in his small book cabinet. I treasure the book to this day and often turn the pages. Some of the poems are by famous historical poets, and others are from the less famous. But all the poetry is so moving and often offer words to stir the heart or the mind.

Poetry Stirs the Heart

The poem below is a few lines proffered by a poet who gave only a Surname – Thompson.

TITLE:  BOOKS,       Thompson.

In my library, “There studious let me sit

And hold high converse with the mighty dead

Sages of ancient time as gods revered,

As gods beneficent, who blessed mankind

With art, with arms, and humanized

A world.”

This second poem was written by Lord Byron. He was one of the leading figures of the Romantic Movement.

TITLE:  BOOKS,       Byron.

But words are things, and a small drop

Of ink.

Falling like dew upon a thought

produces

That which makes thousands, perhaps

millions, think.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote the third poem. He was an American poet and educator.

TITLE. BOOKS,       Longfellow.

Leave us heirs to ample heritages

Of all the best thoughts of the greatest

Sages.

And giving tongue unto the silent dead.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~

Look for LADY LYDIA’S QUEST ~ On sale for 99¢!

Lady Lydia's Quest

About the book:

The Duke of Medhampton invited Lady Lydia Fowler and Lady Olivia Faversham and their families to a week-long round of festivities. It would be an exciting week of hunting, with dancing and soirees in the evenings. As it was the beginning of the Summer Season, the guests would include an influx of debutantes with handsome doweries and suiters with suitable titles.

On the first morning of their stay, to Lady Lydia’s horror, she discovers her dear friend Lady Olivia brutally murdered in her bed. Lord Sebastian Elton, the fiance of the slain young woman, is distraught. Overcome with grief, he vows to find and kill the fiend who took the life of his beloved Olivia.