Song of Hiawatha

In my article of a month ago, I wrote of my beloved uncle. He introduced me to the world of poetry in all its portrayals of love, poverty, laughter, and despair. I also included two poems from the poetry book The Thousand Best Poems In the World.

I would now like to introduce a beloved poem that is world famous. The Song of Hiawatha. This poem was and still is among my favorites. It is in Wikipedia and also in the above book.

Hiawatha

The Song of Hiawatha

On the shores of Gitche Gumee,
Of the shining Big-Sea-Water,
Stood Nokomis, the old woman,
Pointing with her finger westward,
O’er the water pointing westward,
To the purple clouds of sunset.
Fiercely the red sun descending
Burned his way along the heavens,
Set the sky on fire behind him,

As war-parties, when retreating,
Burn the prairies on their war trail;
And the moon, the Night-sun, eastward,
Suddenly starting from his ambush,
Followed fast those bloody footprints,
Followed in that fiery war-trail,

With its glare upon his features.
And Nokomis, the old woman,
Pointing with her finger westward,
Spake these words to Hiawatha:
“Yonder dwells the great Pearl-Feather,
Megissogwon, the Magician,
Manito of Wealth and Wampum,
Guarded by his fiery serpents,
Guarded by the black pitch-water.
You can see his fiery serpents,
The Kenabeek, the great serpents,
Coiling, playing in the water;
You can see the black pitch-water
Stretching far away beyond them,
To the purple clouds of sunset!
“He it was who slew my father,
By his wicked wiles and cunning,
When he from the moon descended,
When he came on earth to seek me.
He, the mightiest of Magicians,
Sends the fever from the marshes,
Sends the pestilential vapors,
Sends the poisonous exhalations,
Sends the white fog from the fen-lands,
Sends disease and death among us!
“Take your bow, O Hiawatha,
Take your arrows, jasper-headed,
Take your war club, Puggawaugun,
And your mittens, Minjekahwun,
And your birch canoe for sailing,
And the oil of Mishe-Nahma,
So to smear its sides, that swiftly
You may pass the black pitch-water;
Slay this merciless magician,
Save the people from the fever
That he breathes across the fen-lands,
And avenge my father’s murder!”………..

The Song of Hiawatha by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, American poet (1807-1882)

Longfellow

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Thousand Best Poems in the World
Selected and Arranged by E.W. Cole
London
Hutchinson & Co.9 Publishers) Ltd.
Paternoster Row. F.C.
Melbourne: Coles Book Arcade

In next month’s article, I would like to introduce poetry that centers on the poverty, love, and history of Victorian times in the U.K.

Looking for books and bundles by Authors’ Billboard authors? Click here.

 

Cherished Poems by @KatyWalters07

I took these poems from a very old book of poetry published in 1891. It is a favorite book for me as it was given to me by my late great uncle. He read them to me of an evening as we sat by an open coal fire.

I am sure my love of literature & poetry was born through him.  He always said he would leave the book to me, and on his sad passing, I received the cherished poems. Some of the poets included in the book do date further back than the nineteenth century.

Book Title: The Thousand Best Poems

Selected and arranged by E. W. Cole.

Publishers: London – Hutchinson & Co. Ltd. Paternoster Row, Melbourne: Coles Book Arcade

The Little Darling’s Shoe

There is a sacred secret place,

Baptized by tears and sighs,

Where little half-worn shoes are kept,

From cold unfeeling eyes.

They have no meaning, save to her

Whose darling’s feet have strayed

Far from the sacred folds of love,

Where late in joy they played.

The impress of a little foot,

How can it be so dear!

How can a little half-worn shoe

Call forth a sigh or tear!

‘Tis more than dear,’ tis eloquent

Of grace and beauty fled;

It waits the sound of little feet –

Sweet sound forever fled.

It whispers to the mother’s ear

A tail of fondest love;

It tells that the little feet –

Now tread the fields above.

Oft has she bathed it with her tears,

Oft kiss’d it o’er and o’er;

If it were filled with costliest gems,

She could not love it more.

Poems

My Bud in Heaven

One bud the Gardener gave me,

A fair and only child,

He gave it to my keeping,

To cherish undefiled;

It lay upon my bosom,

It was my hope, my pride;

Perhaps it was an idol

Which I must be denied.

For just as it was opening,

In glory to the day,

Came down the heavenly Gardener

And took the bud away.

Yet in wrath He took it,

A smile was on His face;

And tenderly and kindly

He bore it from its place.

Fear not, methought He whispered,

Thy bud will be restored,

I take it but plant it

In the garden of my Lord.

Then bid me not to sorrow.

As those who hopeless weep,

For He who gave hath taken,

And He who took can keep.

And night and morn together,

By the open gate of prayer,

I’ll go unto my darling,

And sit beside him there

I know ‘twill open for me,

Poor sinner ‘tho, I be,

For His dear sake who keeps it

And keeps my bud for me.

Mother and Babe 2

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Luscious Mouth-Watering Doughnuts by @KatyWalters07

Doughnuts are always a delicious treat.

doughnuts

The doughnut’s history stems from the cookbook Kuchenmeisterei (Mastery of the Kitchen). This recipe was published in 1485, and Wikipedia explains it was originally a recipe for sugar-free, stuffed, fried dough cakes. However, in the recipe offered here, there is also the addition of sugar and honey or maple syrup.

Dutch settlers brought oykoek (oily cake) to New York. These are very much like the later doughnuts but without the rounded shape.

In England, a recipe for fried dough ‘Nuts’ was published in 1750 entitled How to make Hertfordshire Cakes.

The wife of Baron Thomas Dimsdale also wrote of these famous ‘Nuts’ around 1800. However, the recipe given to the dowager baroness by a friend or acquaintance was entitled ‘dow nuts.’

The first cookbook using the conventional spelling was around 1803.

One of the earliest mentions of ‘doughnut’ was in Washington Irving’s 1809 book A History of New York.

For your information and possibly further interest, this fascinating history was found in Wikipedia – Doughnut Origins.

Happy reading and happy eating.

Luscious Munchy Doughnuts

Preparation Time – 24 minutes

Cook: 12 – 14 mins

Amount. 12

Ingredients:
  • 600 grams plain flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon of baking soda
  • 200 grams white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon of maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon of plain milk with a dash of white vinegar
  • 3 eggs
Directions:
  • Mix together dry ingredients. Then mix in the wet ingredients.
  • Place small mounds or sausage shapes of the mixture on a lightly greased baking tin.
  • Bring oven to 200 degrees C (400 degrees F).
  • Bake for approximately 12 minutes.
  • If you wish, use some chocolate icing on the top of the doughnuts.

ENJOY.

The idea for this recipe came from ‘All Recipes.’

~  ~  ~  ~  ~

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No Requiem, a #poem by @KatyWalters07

No Requiem

A Newhaven Fishwife By Alexander Ignatius Roche – oil on canvas, Public Domain

No Requiem

Moonstone mounds of herring,

Quiver,

Torn from the belly

Of the Sea Mother.

Her baldy rolling, groaning,

Bleeds,

Foam fingers clawing,

Plead.

 

The herring girl,

Slits the guts.

Fish eyes pale,

Beseech,

Steel flick of entrails –

Fish eyes flat.

No requiem for them.

 

The stench of fish, her breath.

Beauty weathered.

Bright eyes tired –

Girl’s eyes flat.

 

Her dreams float with

Dead fish in parsley sauce.

No requiem for her.

 

Copyright Kathleen Ayres/Katy Walters.

In the 1800s and early 1900s, 1000s of girls were employed as fish gutters, following the fishing fleet from Shetland to Yarmouth and Lowestoft. These women knitted whenever they had free time and incorporated patterns they saw in other areas. A former herring girl told of the rivalry between knitters and the one-upmanship of using a new pattern that no-one else in the village had.

The Fisher girls traveled to the fishing ports each season.“

The work was long and hard, the girls were into the “farlin” to be gutted and the “guts were taken out with a very sharp gutting knife”. The girls doing the gutting had their fingers wrapped in “clooties” – bandaged cloths to prevent any knife nicks.

Above info. From Wikipedia

Have a lovely week.

Return to Rhonan

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Dr. Sophie Lampton’s fiance disappears without any trace. He is still missing after a year of extensive searches by the police, family, and friends. Overwhelmed with grief, Sophie succumbs to a social anxiety disorder that threatens her new practice as a psychologist. Her best friend, Dr. Rachael, a sexual psychologist, urges her to seek the help of a renowned professor of psychology, Seth Hunter. Yet the phobia is stopping her from seeking his help. Rachael is determined Sophie should be treated not only for the disorder but for the overwhelming grief. She goes ahead and books an appointment with the professor.
Sophie reluctantly attends a session with Seth, only to break down as a panic attack overwhelms her. Can Seth help her? Can he cut through the paralyzing tentacles of the disorder?

To Love a Cyborg

It is 2065, No-one knows the true identity of Detective Chief Superintendent Ben Tobin or where he came from. His world turns into a nightmare with a spate of shocking homicides and abductions. Determined to solve the sinister notes left with the bodies, he turns to American psychologist Lucy Roberts. Working together they begin a passionate affair that turns into a nightmare.
The clock is ticking, as the crimes take them across the world, and out to the Asteroid Belt.
As Ben races to save the victims, Lucy disappears.
Fast-paced and gritty, this is an electrifying read. A dark thriller that will take you into the night.

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