Freaky Fun Facts by @JoanReeves #mgtab

Add these to your trivia treasury!

First I’ll apologize if this post looks crazy. I logged in to post for today and discovered WordPress changed everything since last month. Oh, well, here goes my blog attempt. Wish me luck.

History is full of quirky little facts. Sometimes, I like to work one or two of these interesting tidbits into the books I write—as long as I can do it organically.

For example, in Heat Lightning, a romantic suspense, I had the nervous heroine entertain the hero with some trivia she’d read about the invention of the vacuum cleaner. Sounds silly, I know, but it broke the ice between them. Trust me, there was plenty of ice between those two.

Of course, I collect far more facts than I can ever use. For your entertainment, in no particular order, here are a few to entertain you. Warning, I read these in a couple of those trivia collection books but cannot verify the truthfulness of them.

Hard To Believe, But…

In 1439, kissing was officially banned in England in an effort stop disease from spreading. (Bet the whole nation became a bunch of lawbreakers.)

In 1912, a Paris orphanage held a raffle to raise money and gave away live babies as prizes!

John F. Kennedy, Anthony Burgess, Aldous Huxley, and C.S. Lewis all died on the same day.

Karl Marx was once a correspondent for the New York Daily Tribune.

Ronald Reagan was a lifeguard during high school and saved 77 people’s lives. (Seriously?)

Everyone knows the Aztecs made human sacrifices, but did you know in 1487, 20,000 people were sacrificed at the dedication of the temple in Tenochtitlan.

The Romans used human urine as mouthwash. (OMG!!!)

On the subject of urine, in the Regency period when men retired to a room for whisky, it was common for them to urinate into the fireplace.

In the 19th century a popular medicine for kids was Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup which had morphine as the active ingredient.

In early Rome a father could legally kill anyone in his family.

A couple of centuries ago, pregnant women were not given anything to relieve the pain of childbirth because pain was considered God’s punishment for Eve’s eating the forbidden fruit.

Attila the Hun bled to death from a nosebleed on his wedding night.

People have been wearing glasses for about 700 years.

February 1865 is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon.

There is no known civilization that did not tax. Even the very first known civilization, the Sumerians, recorded their tax history on clay cones.

For Your Consideration: Heat Lightning

Secrets, lies, passion. What Tessa doesn’t remember may just be the death of her.

Her husband found her, claimed her, rescued her. David’s touch makes Tessa throb. Desire flashes between them like heat lightning on a summer night. Her body knows David, but when she looks at him, he is a stranger to her. Not a flicker of memory is left of him or their life together since she awakened from a coma.

Amnesia has left her with nothing but questions. Who is she? Why does David seem to hate her even as he pulls her into his arms? What is he hiding? How can she trust him when her gut says, Trust no one?

As her love for David grows, so does her feeling of foreboding—as if something awful is watching and waiting.

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Post Script

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Halloween by Mona Risk

Did you know that one quarter of all the candy sold annually in the U.S. is purchased for Halloween?  Yes, October is the cruelest month for our molar teeth. Today, Americans spend an estimated $6 billion annually on Halloween, making it the country’s second largest commercial holiday.

 

It is hard to imagine that 100 years ago, Halloween looked quite different from the candy debauch of today.

Halloween origin: Halloween is thought to have originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off roaming ghosts. In the eighth century, Pope Gregory III designated November 1 as a time to honor all saints and martyrs; the holiday, All Saints’ Day, incorporated some of the traditions of Samhain. The evening before was known as All Hallows’ Eve and later Halloween.

 

History of Halloween: At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes. Parents were encouraged by newspapers and community leaders to take anything “frightening” or “grotesque” out of Halloween celebrations. Because of these efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the twentieth century.

The seemingly timeless custom of trick-or-treating is actually a quite recent American invention. The ritual of costumes, doorbell-ringing, and expectation of booty appeared for the first time in different locations throughout the country in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

It wasn’t until the late 1940s that trick-or-treating became widespread on a national scale. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration. A new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow.

Decorating the house inside and out is part of what makes this holiday so much fun with gargoyles, demons, and zombies; or spiders and bats, or anything that can make your visitors scream.

My grandchildren are turning their beautiful front-yard into a scary graveyard with skulls, skeletons, insects and rodents that give their grandmother–poor me–the fright of my life. Of course, the louder I scream, the harder these scamps laugh. Planning and designing the Halloween costumes start at the beginning of October.

 

 

Next Friday happens to be a Friday the Thirteen. My grandchildren will wear their costumes and invite their friends for a carving and painting of pumpkins.

 

 

 

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https://www.bookbub.com/authors/mona-risk

Have a spooky and fun —>>