About Nancy Radke

A USA Today bestselling author, Nancy Radke grew up on a wheat and cattle ranch in SE Washinton State. She attended a one-room country school through the eighth grade. She learned to ride bareback at age 3 (Really! It was a common practice.) and when she got off or fell off, she would pull her horse's nose to the ground, get on behind its ears, and the horse would lift its head so she could scoot down onto its back. Nancy spent most of her childhood exploring the Blue Mountain trails that bordered the ranchlands. She and a friend once took a trail that turned out to be a two day trip. They always rode with matches and pocket knives, so made camp and returned the next day. These long rides worried her parents, but provided plenty of time to make up stories. Her first novel was set in the Blues, and is entitled APPALOOSA BLUES. TURNAGAIN LOVE was the first one published. It rated a four star review from Affaire de Coeur. Scribes World said "Turnagain Love has some fascinating twists and turns, unexpected complications, and charming scenes." It is light and humorous. Nancy currently has over 30 books written, both modern and western. All her stories are sweet and wholesome.  View website

Stargazing: Beautiful Scenery that is Everywhere by @_NancyRadke

The joys of stargazing and cloud-watching are that they go with you wherever you are, as long as you can see the sky. Summer, winter, the season doesn’t matter nor does the surrounding landscape. What does affect stargazing is the amount of light on the ground, or if there is a full moon, which hides the stars around it.

Stargazing

If you are in a city with many lights, it is difficult to see more than a few stars. But get away from the city and the sky reveals that it is covered with stars everywhere. In Alaska, the stars were often joined by the Aurora Borealis. The Northern Lights decorate the night sky with beauty and color. This is especially lovely during the dark winter months when we only have a few hours of sunshine.

The Joy of Stargazing

Stargazing was probably one of my greatest joys when growing up on a ranch. I used to sleep outside during harvest time so that I could look at the stars. They rotate around the North Star, so that the Big Dipper acts like the hands of a clock. I used to be able to tell time by them, since I saw them so often. When I rode my horse at night, which I often did, I would try to see how close I could come to the actual time by reading the star rotation. The same can be done with the sun during the day.

Cloud-watching is best done with cumulus clouds. The big fluffy kind that lets you imagine figures and landscapes, and that constantly change as you watch them. Teach your children the names of the different kinds of clouds, the names of some of the stars, and the constellations. No matter where they are in the world, the information will enrich their lives. If they travel to the Southern Hemisphere, the stars will rotate in the opposite direction and there will be different constellations, but the basic knowledge will get them started.

Star Rotation

I usually mention the stars in my western books. The pioneers used the stars to set their directions, placing the wagon tongue at night to point north.

Nancy Radke

Home Learning by @_NancyRadke

Parents have experienced Home Learning now, and I hope they will not forsake it. When children come home from school with “homework,” parents are expected to teach it because the teachers couldn’t teach it in their large classrooms that have a vast spectrum of abilities among the students. If you want your kid to survive, you need to home-school. Just remember Dr. Ben Carson, the outstanding brain surgeon whose mother couldn’t read, but she made Ben and his brother read to her every day. Even that form of Home Learning had a great result.

Home Learning

Why teach your children to read at home, before they go to school? They have so many things to learn, but to wait until they go to school to learn to read is not the best practice. They are eager to learn everything at age 4 and this eagerness is lost over time. Plus, once they start school, they have so many things infringing on their attention and learning time, that they can’t learn as well as they can in the one-on-one home environment. The older the child, the harder it is to teach him.

The Ideal Age for Home Learning

Children are at the ideal age to learn to read when they are just turning four years old. This is when they are excited to learn and are able to absorb vast amounts of information effortlessly, making it the ideal time to teach them. Like new plants, they drink in the information as fast as you can present it. Often as you teach an older four-year-old, the three-year-old sibling will be picking it up at the same time. I have had parents report this to me many times. These children can be reading at a 3rd to 4th grade level when they enter first grade.

To help parents teach a 4-year-old to read, I put together the “Raising Giants Free Reading Course.” It consists of 4 videos and a printout of lessons to follow, then suggestions of books to read. When downloaded, it looks simple. How can that possibly teach a child to read? But if you listen to the videos and learn the sounds and the patterns, you will be able to teach your child in a surprisingly short time. One father said after a number of lessons, that he was standing on the street corner with his 4-year-old daughter when he realized she was reading off the signs and the names on the stores around them.

The program also addresses children with reading problems and directs you to other resources. You can access it here:

www.raisingupgiants.wixsite.com/free

One of my books centers around a child with dyslexia who is having problems learning to read. It points the reader to another program that helps children having reading difficulties. This book, a romance, is called Christmas on Cougar Mountain, and is permanently free everywhere. Download you copy today.

Christmas On Cougar Mountain

 

The Golden Legacy: Great Wealth’s Dangers by @_NancyRadke

April might be rainy in other parts of the US, but in Seattle this year we have had some spectacular days, warm and sunny, causing our flowers and flowering trees to burst into bloom. The birds have burst into song, and I’m waiting for the moment when I, as a writer, will burst into words. So far it hasn’t happened.

The only way to write is to start writing, so that is what I’m trying to do, but I find my story has gone south the way of the geese and hasn’t flown back north yet. One of the reasons might be that I just finished a book, Dangerous Inheritance, which is my second book as part of the Golden Legacy series.

The Golden Legacy

 

Now Selling on Amazon

The set, The Golden Legacy, is now available for Kindle readers. This set consists of five books, with two of them (contemporaries) having been written by me. These are all rags to riches stories, almost Cinderella types, where one of the protagonists comes into a fabulous legacy. The riches have a curse attached as well as a blessing, requiring the inheritor to spend the money in certain ways. Use it wrongly, and you lose the money as well as what you already have. Because sudden wealth is often looked on with suspicion, the theme has a built-in element of danger.

The authors in this series have spanned time from the 1700s up to modern day. Suzanne’s book has a seaman getting part of the treasure. He uses it after a slave rebellion to rescue a woman he admires.

Twist of Fate

Rebecca’s story centers around a young man trying to raise his daughter and save his race horse business. The book is set in the 1800s. The young woman who helps him becomes the fulfillment of his dreams.

Race for the Gold

My two stories are contemporary, with people trying to get the woman and the money. Dangerous Inheritance (not published anywhere else) forces the hero to choose between the legacy and the woman he loves.

Nancy Radke The Golden Legacy

Katy Walters book bounces between two centuries, using a time portal and the legacy as a common item.

the price of love

Click the image below to learn more about this series and buy all five books for just 99¢.

The Golden Legacy

Growing Sprouts by @_NancyRadke

Dear Gardener who can hardly wait for spring. Take this quiz:

  • What am I?
  • I am a fresh vegetable that needs no garden soil.
  • I can be eaten within four to seven days.
  • Minimal care is needed to grow me.
  • I must be grown in a closet or dark area.
  • My seeds keep for years.
  • I am not a mushroom.

If you guessed sprouts, give yourself an A. Growing spouts is fun and easy. I used to grow sprouts all the time, then stopped about eleven years ago. Hungry for them (especially mung bean sprouts in my egg omelets – Egg Foo Yung), I tried to buy some fresh sprouts at the grocery stores. No luck. Ditto at the smaller markets.

Opening my refrigerator, I found three different bags of seeds left over from my last sprouting years ago. I figured some seeds might still be viable, so I put about a tablespoon of each into separate glass jars, soaked them for six hours, then dumped off the water through a strainer, and put the jars into my cupboard. It was just that easy to start growing sprouts again.

Growing Sprouts

Here’s The Secret to Growing Sprouts

The trick is to keep the seeds from completely drying out but not sitting in water and rotting. Do this by rinsing them in cold water in the morning, at night, and two to three times a day and pouring off the water. Always return them to the cupboard and close the door. Sprouts like to grow in the dark. 

By day two little sprouts began to show, tiny ones on my alfalfa seeds and large ones on the mung beans. To prove the viability of seeds kept in closed bags in the refrigerator, I didn’t find any of them that didn’t sprout, even after all those years.

You can let them grow small leaves if you want to. I usually cap my jar and put it in the refrigerator to stop the sprouting process just as the leaves begin to develop. I had my first egg omelet with bean sprouts five days after starting to grow them. My salad mix of small seeds went into pocket bread. I mixed some of the alfalfa sprouts into my green salad.

Growing Sprouts

Growing sprouts really adds to your fresh food supply. All it takes is some seeds, a mesh strainer, and a glass jar. I use distilled water to avoid fluoride and the rest of the chemicals added to city water, so rinsed my sprouts in that.

WARNING: Only buy sprouting seeds that are meant for sprouting. You can get mung beans and alfalfa seeds at Amazon. Seed companies often treat garden planting seeds with a poison to prevent bugs from eating the seeds. So buy your seeds from a company that sells food-grade (safe) seeds for sprouting.

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