About Nancy Radke

A USA Today bestselling author, Nancy Radke grew up on a wheat and cattle ranch in SE Washinton State. She attended a one-room country school through the eighth grade. She learned to ride bareback at age 3 (Really! It was a common practice.) and when she got off or fell off, she would pull her horse's nose to the ground, get on behind its ears, and the horse would lift its head so she could scoot down onto its back. Nancy spent most of her childhood exploring the Blue Mountain trails that bordered the ranchlands. She and a friend once took a trail that turned out to be a two day trip. They always rode with matches and pocket knives, so made camp and returned the next day. These long rides worried her parents, but provided plenty of time to make up stories. Her first novel was set in the Blues, and is entitled APPALOOSA BLUES. TURNAGAIN LOVE was the first one published. It rated a four star review from Affaire de Coeur. Scribes World said "Turnagain Love has some fascinating twists and turns, unexpected complications, and charming scenes." It is light and humorous. Nancy currently has over 30 books written, both modern and western. All her stories are sweet and wholesome.  View website

Be Prepared

It pays to be prepared. Little things can make a big difference in how you handle an emergency.

I remember when Seattle had some pretty deep snowfalls. The weight of the snow and ice brought down tree limbs, resulting in power outages for two weeks or longer. The snow took our electricity, but because it wasn’t a city-wide outage, we got our power restored in six hours. As I lit my candles and made sure my natural gas stove was burning, I wondered how people with only electric appliances were doing.

Be Prepared

The first step to being prepared is to check the weather history of your area and see what weather emergencies are the most common. In Seattle, we don’t worry about hurricanes, but we do have high winds in the spring and fall that topples trees, sometimes an entire forest area at a time. In my area, the trees fall to the north, so I took down large Douglas Fir trees on my south side and planted some “people friendly” trees that won’t destroy my home or cars when they fall.

Prepare alternate sources of heat, light, water, and money.
  • Heat: have a pellet stove, wood burning, or natural gas stove that will keep your house warm. Avoid what happened a few years ago in Texas where the windmills froze, killing some people without electricity.
  • Light: flashlights are nice, but batteries don’t last forever, so keep some candles in a box, along with some matches or a lighter.
  • Water: in case of flooding, clean drinking water is a must.
  • Money: when the cash registers won’t take your credit cards for lack of electricity, cash is always accepted. Keep a reasonable amount on hand, to buy food or medicines.

Forest fires are on the rampage because the federal forests are not being managed like they used to. If the underbrush is not cut (making tinder) and mature trees not harvested like we used to do, then it sets up a situation where the forests burn so hot it is almost impossible to put them out. If you live in an area where this might happen, make sure you have fireproof shingles and siding and cut away trees from the house. Hot fires send sparks airborne, so that a strong wind carries the fire miles ahead of the actual burn. Also fix a “bug-out bag” so that you can leave instantly if you have to. Know your escape routes before you have to drive.

Think ahead.

Don’t be like the man who prepared for a hurricane by buying a large amount of steaks to put in his freezer so that he’d have enough to eat. After he got them home, he realized he wouldn’t have any electricity to keep the freezer going. So, he set up his barbecue and invited all his neighbors over for a steak dinner.

One of my books, Stolen Secrets, is set during an unexpected pre-Thanksgiving snowstorm that we had some years ago in Seattle. Another book, Turnagain Love, is set on a small island, where the heroine discovers she doesn’t have any water or electricity or a way to get off the island. Another survival book, The Toughest Man in the Territory, is set in Wyoming near Yellowstone Park.

Nancy Radke Christmas

A FREE gift for you!

Avalanche Puppy is FREE in the Kindle Store Dec 9, 10, and 11.

Avalanche Puppy

 

Early Childhood Education — The home is a far better teacher than public schools

Investigators discovered that kids who were sent to public pre-schools for early childhood education learned early, but didn’t advance like kids who had been taught at home before they entered school. The kids taught at home kept accelerating past the ones who had been put into public classes where there were many kids. The one on one teaching with a loving parent outshone the public school, where it mainly turned into babysitting, or worse.

If you have a child in today’s government schools, you are fortunate if your child’s teacher finds time to teach phonics “on the side.” The reading materials currently furnished by the schools do actual physical harm that can be observed in brain scans, handicapping the child for life. The government’s own data show that less than a third of its child victims are proficient in any core subject.

The answer to this is:

Don’t wait for the schools. Any teaching done at home is better than what the schools are doing. Teach your child to read and do math before they enter school. It does NOT have to be done regularly or often. A young child soaks up learning at an amazing rate. Start math at age 3, reading at age 4.

Use objects: blocks or sticks or marbles or rocks to teach counting and basic math. “If you have four oranges and give two oranges to your teddy bear, how many oranges will you have left?” Then switch to using an abacus. There are online programs showing you how to use them, starting at age 4. After a while, a four-year-old can visualize the abacus and do complex problems in his head. If you wait until they are older, they can’t do this. For math from K-college, go to Khan academy, free, and includes other sciences.

For reading, go to www.raisingupgiants.wixsite.com/free  Start this program at age four and expect huge gains from little effort on your part. It contains four videos plus a small reader. Watch video #1 if you are fearful or doubt you can teach. Otherwise start with video #2. And if you can, at all possible, keep your child out of most public schools. You won’t see any of our leaders sending their kids to them.

I have a free romance novella centered about reading, called Christmas on Cougar Mountain. Another novella, this one about a teacher, Zsuzsa’s Christmas Wish, is free this weekend.

Early Childhood Education

Zsuzsa's Christmas Wish

 

BEING A SURVIVOR by Nancy Radke

Being a survivor often depends upon your mental state. You can die if you decide that that’s what you’re going to do, but some people survive impossible odds.

Survivor

When my husband was a Boy Scout back in the early 1950s, he and another Boy Scout accompanied their scout leader carrying trout fingerlings into the Cascade Mountains to “seed” the lakes. This involved backpacking gallons of water filled with the baby trout along miles of forest trails. If the lake wasn’t named, they got to name it as well as seed it.

He mentioned that on one trip they came across a man who had broken his leg into multiple fractures. The man was pulling himself along the trail and asked them how far it was to the trailhead where he had left his car. He was miles away but was cheerful and determined to make it. When they returned, he was much further along the trail and they helped him the rest of the way.

A Different Experience…

On the very same trip they were hiking in to another lake and came across a man who was lying beside the trail with a broken leg. It was not nearly as serious as the first man’s injuries, but this man had given up and was waiting to die. He was only a quarter of a mile from the trailhead, but refused to take a stout stick for a cane and try to make it on his own. They went on to the lake, then returned. The man was still in the same spot, so the scout leader told him he would send help—and left him there.

It was a lesson my husband never forgot. This was before his family moved to Alaska when he was twelve years old.

Many people who survived the Holocaust lived long afterwards, to see their children and grandchildren. Today, we have people in China who are being persecuted to the point of death in the labor camps there. The survivors tell stories of horror and torture, yet we have people in the U.S. living in freedom who think they can’t make it if things get tough.

Many of my books are about survival. In Courage Dares, the hero convinces the heroine that she is a survivor. The Toughest Man in the Territory and The Luckiest Man in the West, feature heroes and heroines work together to cross the wilderness. In Dangerous Heritage, the danger is from modern-day kidnappers.Courage Dares

Courage Dares is on sale this coming Friday.

 

 

 

Compassion in the 21st Century   

Compassion: a desire to help someone in need. When you show compassion to another person, it enriches your life as well as his. Yet to show compassion to someone, you must become involved in his life.

How do you become involved in another person’s life? Usually you talk to him, and learn about what is going on. Where he’s having problems and needs help. Last century, the telephone was invented, and people could now talk to each other even over large distances. People communicated, and reached out to each other.

Compassion is caring for another

Then, in this century, with the invention of the cell phone, texting became the normal way of communicating. Everyone texts, it seems, short sentences sometimes with the words shortened to U and FYI, which require an interpreter to read them. People text while they are walking in traffic, while shopping, while in a class, but worse, people text while they are at home, asking a question of someone else. How involved can you become when you can’t even hear the other person’s voice, whether he sounds tired or discouraged or happy or defiant? How do you know that this person needs the compassion or friendship you are willing to give him?

Texting, a tool of isolation

Instead of becoming an aid to communication, texting on cell phones has become a tool of isolation. Many people isolate themselves at home, reaching out only through texts. Teens shut themselves in their rooms, when they should be out developing social skills needed for life. Texting should never replace conversation, which is how we interact with other people. When you talk to someone, you find out much more about him and his life, his feelings, and thoughts; more than you will ever find out by texting. Texting is great for setting up appointments, but it should not be used to as the sole way to sustain friendships. Everyone needs friends, as man is a social being.  

Cell phones have replaced our computers, watches, alarm clocks, maps, and our way of communicating. Lets not let them replace our families and friends.

In my book, Turnagain Love, the heroine is isolated on a small island. With no cell tower close by, she can’t call for help. Since three of anything—three large rocks, three honks, three shouts—is the universal signal of distress, she places her white clothes into three groups, making three large white circles out on the beach. Her efforts are rewarded by the arrival of the hero in a large motorboat. But he hasn’t come to help her. If fact, he never even noticed her signal. So what is he doing?

In another book, Terminal Pursuit, the main characters have thrown their cell phones away to keep from being tracked. They now have no way of getting in touch with each other as they try to evade the killers.  Terminal Pursuit is in the set: Unforgettable Temptations.