About Katy Walters

Katy lives on the South coast with her husband and a loving hyper friendly dog who likes to greet and lick everyone on sight. She has a BA Hons (Psych) BA Eng.Lit. MA in Religion and Mysticism and a Hon Dr. Science for research into pain control. She was a psychologist and hypnotherapist before changing direction for full time creative writing, Her main genres are historical romance, crime and science fiction.

Kingley Vale by @KatyWalters07

In Kingley Vale, near Chichester in West Sussex, England, nestles an ancient forest of yews over 2,000 years old, believed to be the oldest living organisms in Great Britain. Above this prehistoric combe stand The Kings Graves, otherwise known as the Devil’s Humps. They are supposed to be the graves of Anglo Saxon Kings and marauding Vikings.

In the hours of darkness, it is sometimes said that the ghosts of ancient Druids haunt the forest, mingling with the slain Anglo Saxons and slaughtered Danes. There are tales of the druids carrying out rituals and sacrifices in the hours of darkness, where the trees bleed and change shape moving amongst the ghostly figures of the dead and the living. For some, it is a place for spiritual healing; for others a place of dark rituals.

Buzzards have returned to Kingley Vale


Kingley Vale

Kingley Vale treads into my heart,

Its paths of loam roam arteries,

Twigs carve through capillaries.

Falling leaves sleeve the skin.

Ancient peat, fleshing feet.

Roots grope the hungering breath,

Feeding, raising Sorcerer and Druid.

Slain sacrificial maid long dead,

Leavens the bread of my emptiness.

Ghouls whisper in death stench groves,

Of Wicca, the Priestess, the dagger.

Owl’s eyes light the night, as the raven cries,

Covering terror’s screams and death’s moans,

On stone altar, the ravaging Warlock groans.

Moon Mother throws her silver lance,

Elf and fairy, gnome and crone,

Leap and weep in the ecstasy of dance.

The steel ping of the coca-cola tin,

Snaps my reverie,

Kingley Vale treads gently

Back into the caverns of my soul

Whispering, forever, whispering.

Copyright: Katy Walters, 1998

Kingley Vale Deer

Chocolate Sponge Cake #Recipe by @KatyWalters07

I do love this recipe for Chocolate Sponge Cake. It is easy and always has perfect results. This cake is a good size and will last a family of five approximately four to five days. It is also the base for a number of sponge cakes; for instance, the Victoria Sponge with a delicious strawberry jam filling.

Ingredients for the Chocolate Sponge Cake:

For the cake- Chocolate Sponge Cake

  • 6 ozs Self-Rising Flour
  • 6 ozs Butter or Margarine, softened
  • 6 ozs Castor Sugar (Granulated)
  • 50 gm Cocoa Powder
  • 4 Medium-Size Eggs

For the filling and top (see image)-

  • 175 gm Butter
  • 375 gm Icing Sugar (Confectioner’s)
  • 90 gm Cocoa Powder
  • 2-4 Tablespoons Milk

Directions to make the Chocolate Sponge Cake:

  1. Preheat oven to 180C/160C (350F) – Fan Gas 4. Spray two 7-inch round cake tins with baking spray, then set aside.
  2. Add flour, butter, sugar, cocoa powder, and eggs into the bowl of an electric stand mixer.
  3. Mix on medium speed until all ingredients are thoroughly combined and creamy.
  4. Divide into two 7-inch cake tins and bake for about 30 minutes or until golden brown.
  5. Let the cakes sit for about 10 minutes, then remove from pans. Allow cakes to cool on a cooling rack before filling and icing.

Directions for the filling/top:

  1. Add butter, sugar, and cocoa to the bowl of an electric stand mixer.
  2. Mix on low, adding only enough milk to make a spreadable icing/filling (see cake image).
  3. Spread half of the mixture on top of one layer. Top with second layer. Spread remaining mixture on top of the cake.

Hurrah! Chocolate Sponge Cake is decadently rich. However, it is a fantastic treat for the family, or for your hubby. Above all, it is a wonderful treat for YOU. Why? Because you can’t have too much chocolate.

~  ~  ~

Look for A LADY IN DISTRESS, Book 1 of the Lords of Wessex

An exciting Regency Suspense Romance

Grab a copy for only £0.80 in the UK Kindle Store

Or 99¢ in the US Kindle Store

Katy Walters

Kingley Vale by Katy Walters @KatyWalters07

In Kingley Vale, near Chichester in West Sussex, England, nestles an ancient forest of yews over 2,000 years old, believed to be the oldest living organisms in Great Britain. Above this prehistoric combe stand The Kings Graves, otherwise known as the Devil’s Humps. They are supposed to be the graves of Anglo Saxon Kings and marauding Vikings. Kingley Vale

It is said the ghosts of ancient Druids haunt the forest, mingling with the slain Anglo-Saxons. For some, it is a place of spiritual healing, for others a place of mystery and beauty.

Kingley Vale

Kingley Vale treads into my heart,

Its paths of loam roam arteries,

Twigs carve through capillaries.

Falling leaves, sleeve the skin.

Ancient peat, fleshing feet.

Roots grope the hungering breath,

Feeding, raising Sorcerer and Druid.

Slain sacrificial maid long dead,

Leavens the bread of my emptiness.

Ghouls whisper in death stench groves,

Of Wicca, the Priestess, the dagger.

Owl’s eyes light the night, as the raven cries,

Covering terror’s screams and death’s moans,

On stone altar the ravaging Warlock groans.

Moon Mother throws her silver lance,

Elf and fairy, gnome and crone,

Leap and weep in the ecstasy of dance.

The steel ping of the coca cola tin,

Snaps my reverie,

Kingley Vale treads gently

Back into the caverns of my soul

Whispering, forever, whispering.

Copyright: Katy Walters: 1998

Look for THE LADY LOSES A SHOE, a Regency Romance, available for just 99 cents. Kindle Unlimited members can read this book for free.

Kingley Vale

A Victorian Christmas

Hello, I thought some happy Victorian Christmas poems would be great for this time of year, but they are hard to come by. The lyrics generally break your heart by the second verse.
But I was in luck as I found a humorous one, but I also came across this modern poem that touches the heart. So I put that one on first. The Victorian poetry that follows is light and flighty for the Victorians, that is!!


Little tree
little tree
little silent Christmas tree
you are so little
you are more like a flower
who found you in the green forest
and were you very sorry to come away?
see i will comfort you
because you smell so sweetly
i will kiss your cool bark
and hug you safe and tight
just as your mother would,
only don’t be afraid
look the spangles
that sleep all the year in a dark box
dreaming of being taken out and allowed to shine,
the balls the chains red and gold the fluffy threads,
put up your little arms
and i’ll give them all to you to hold
every finger shall have its ring
and there won’t be a single place dark or unhappy…

Poem by E.E. Cummings found in Ten Beautiful Christmas Poems on website Leah Dobrinska

Berries on holly proclaim ‘tis cold!

Cousin Annette, I am warmer thus;

A hand and a waist if my arms enfold,

The hand and waist will be cozy, puss!

For here we can sit and defy the wind,

Though panes are rattled with blinding sleet,

And happily one of us thus may find

That winter is best for us both, my sweet!

 

Mistletoe grows on the oak they say!

Cousin Annette! – she is fast asleep,

But this is a dangerous game to play,

For wandering rogues may on tiptoe creep.

The mistletoe’s beckoning over her head,

My fluttering heart, you must cease to beat;

Sleep soft! While over the floor I tread –

And wake at the touch of my lips, my sweet!

 

Winter is bringing the travellers home!

Cousin Annette, have I cause to fear

Lest one loved better than I may come

To claim the hand that is resting here?

The falsest women are fair as you,

And lips as pretty have sworn deceit;

But on my honour I’d swear you true –

As true as the rose at your breast, my sweet!

 

Winter is long! Ay, winter’s long!

Cousin Annette, is it time to go?

Perchance the lover and love-sick song

May melt forever with winter’s snow?

The dearest thoughts in the heart lie deep

Through snows of winter and rose-time heat,

But if your memory tries to sleep,

Remember the mistletoe kiss, my sweet!

 

Excerpt from ‘The Mistletoe Kiss’ from London Society Christmas edition 1868.

The Mistletoe Kiss

A Winter Song by Clement W. Scott

HAVE A  WONDERFUL  AND HAPPY

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR.

Short Christmas stories to enjoy all year long. Christmas Shorts, EIGHTEEN sweet to spicy tales to enjoy any time of year.