Dogwoods are Blooming by Rachelle Ayala #mgtab @mimisgang1

Hey friends, I’m in Western North Carolina this week and caught the transition from winter to spring. It was cold and rainy last week with downpours on Saturday, but come Easter Sunday, and the sun was up, the skies were blue, and the dogwoods were blooming.

I’ve come to learn how special the dogwood is, especially here in Western North Carolina where the dogwood blossom is the state flower. It started blooming this past week and temperatures warmed up nicely. There’s still a nip in the air in the morning and the days are sunny and bright. But sun worshippers, watch out! You never know when another cold snap might be heading your way. If so, the old timers call it a Dogwood Winter and that usually happens right about now.

Here are some fun facts about dogwoods:

  • The dogwood tree, with its delicate and ethereal blossoms, has long been associated with love, romance, and new beginnings. In the secret language of flowers from the Victorian era, the dogwood blossom represented durability and reliability, reflecting the strength of its wood. And guess what? It’s not just about romantic love. It’s also about the unwavering support and dependability we find in our dearest friendships.
  • The dogwood’s four-petaled flowers, resembling a cross with a crown of thorns in the center, speak of love’s ability to endure, sacrifice, and grow stronger through life’s challenges. So, whether you’re embarking on a romantic journey or celebrating a cherished friendship, the dogwood tree serves as a beautiful symbol of the deep bonds that connect us.
  • Dogwood Winter is a gentle reminder from Mother Nature not to get too carried away by the warmth and excitement of spring just yet. It’s a brief pause, a moment to cherish the beauty of the dogwood blossoms and the love and friendships they symbolize, before fully embracing the season of renewal and growth.
  • Long ago, a young Native American couple was in love, but their families were enemies. They decided to run away together, but they were pursued by their angry relatives. They prayed to the Great Spirit for help, and he turned them into two dogwood trees that grew close together. Their blossoms were white to symbolize their purity and innocence.

It’s not only dogwoods that are blooming here, but also azaleas, redbuds, and wild cherries. A quick drive along the Blue Ridge Parkway will reward you with a burst of spring color, from the light-green buds to the showy purple-pink and reds. Western North Carolina is a great place to bring in springtime with its rivers and ponds, birds, tadpoles, bumblebees, and dandelions galore.

If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, I hope spring is budding right around the corner for you, too. As for me, I’m enjoying my family time, and working on two romances: Blue Mooned: Diamond, a light-hearted romantic fantasy, and Where Love Blossoms, a light and easy beach and vacation romance. Happy April, wherever you are!


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About Rachelle Ayala

Rachelle Ayala is a USA Today bestselling author of contemporary romance and romantic suspense. Her foremost goal is to take readers on a shared emotional journey with her characters as they grow and become more true to themselves. Rachelle believes in the power of love to overcome obstacles and feels that everyone should find love as often as possible, especially if it's within the pages of a book. Her book, Knowing Vera, won the 2015 Angie Ovation Award, A Father for Christmas garnered a 2015 Readers’ Favorite Gold Award, Christmas Stray received a 2016 Readers' Favorite Gold Award, and Playing for the Save got the 2017 Readers' Favorite Gold Award in Realistic Fiction. She is also a writing teacher and founder of the Romance In A Month writing community. She lives in California with her husband and has three children and two birds.

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