DEPRESSION AT CHRISTMAS TIME

DepressionInstead of giving you a menu you’d probably never use, or ho, ho, ho, the happy time of Christmas, I am going to talk about Depression. My son, Rhys died in February/19 after his heart was destroyed on Dec.20th by a woman he trusted. He’d known her 9 years, she was the mother of his daughter’s best friend. He was also clinically depressed. He left his two beautiful daughters behind.  The following information is from the internet at Professors House website.

Christmas is the most likely time of the year to experience depression. The suicide rate is higher during December than any other month. This tells us that Christmas depression should be taken seriously. Loss, failure, and loneliness are just a few of the things that can trigger depression at Christmas time.

Holidays are stressful.

People fail to recognize that holidays are stressful enough to trigger a depression. Sometimes the hustle and bustle and the need to produce (food, presents, parties, and the lot) are enough to seriously frustrate a person right into a depression. Feeling disconnected with the holidays can easily lead to a mild to moderate depression.

Whether dealing with a loss or change or simply feeling overwhelmed by holiday sadness, the number one most important thing anyone can do is to tell someone. Asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness. Over the past ten years there has been a great awakening, so to speak, that has illuminated the issue of Christmas depression. People have become more educated and more understanding about the phenomenon and often already know that someone they love is suffering from depression before there is any actual confession.

If you are alone at Christmastime and you realize that you are coming down with holiday depression, reach out to someone by phone, whether it is a friend, a relative, or a professional, just call someone. This is so important. There is nothing to be ashamed of and there are plenty of people willing and able to assist you. A bad moment (even a really long one that last several weeks) does not have to ruin a future. Unfortunately people who find themselves depressed and do nothing about it are prone to staying depressed. Depression can interfere with job performance, friendships, romantic relationships. I can affect parenting, self care, and even the ability to take care of the dog. It can lead to losses of these very important things if the depression becomes serious enough.

DON’T IGNORE THE WARNING SIGNS!

Dealing with a holiday depression once you are able to recognize it is a vital step in returning to a better state of health. Naturally, my first recommendation is that you find a good counselor to speak with. The onset of holiday depression doesn’t have to mean that you require long term counseling or even medication. It may just mean you have to learn to set better boundaries or learn to let go of the past or learn better coping skills when it comes to dealing with a tragedy. Nothing that you are experiencing is so terribly abnormal, and no one is going to react terribly to you if you ask for help.

A good counselor can help you learn to set “holiday boundaries” while you are coping with holiday depression. “Holiday boundaries” include things like limiting the number of holiday party invitations, scaling down Christmas, and asking for help. It’s okay to deal a little differently with the specific tasks that tend to depress you more. Wrapping presents can trigger an emotion or a memory. Consider asking for help so that you don’t have to wrap nearly as many. Sometimes just doing it with someone is enough to help keep your depression away.

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About Patrice Wilton

Patrice Wilton knew from the age of twelve that she wanted to write books that would take the reader to faraway places. She was born in Vancouver, Canada, and had a great need to see the world that she had read about. Patrice became a flight attendant for seventeen years and traveled the world. At the age of forty she sat down to write her first book—in longhand! Her interests include tennis, golf, and writing stories for women of all ages. She is a mother of two, has four lovely grand-daughters, and a wonderful man at her side. They live in West Palm Beach, Florida, where he teaches her golf, and she teaches him patience. Her best selling books are the CANDY BAR series, SERENDIPITY FALLS series, and most recently PARADISE COVE and A CHRISTMAS COLLECTION series. She is a New York Times best selling author.  View website

8 Replies to “DEPRESSION AT CHRISTMAS TIME”

  1. Hugs and much love, Patrice – my father had clinical depression and attempted suicide. Truthfully, I didn’t like him much, but if it had been my child, that’s a different matter entirely and incredibly difficult. You are a strong woman, but even so, if you ever want to chat with me about anything, I’m always around. xoxo

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