Retirement Planning by Nancy Radke #mgtab

Retirement planning involves a lot more than just trying to save money. It involves choosing where to live and how to support yourself. Often it means downsizing or selling your home. It is one of the things I did, selling my large house and building an ADU (additional dwelling unit) onto my daughter’s home. There is a door between the two, so that we both have privacy, but if I need help I can just open the door.

I figured I was building my own retirement home, so considered things like wheelchair access (if it was ever needed) and no stairs. I also have an adjoining room that is for my office. And since I won’t live forever, I designed it so that two people could live in it comfortably.

Retirement can mean many things to people. For some, it is a chance to travel and see places they’ve never been. (The photos above are of some of our other authors, having fun.) For others, it means finding some other form of work, since Social Security increases are actually decreases once they take out the increased health care cost. The longer you live, the less you have to live on.

Ideally, you want to have some sort of income stream that doesn’t depend upon you having to work. I was fortunate that my husband bought some rental duplexes, so I have a steady amount coming in from that, besides my books. People need to find some type of investment to help them. Savings is fine if you have enough to last and the rising cost of living doesn’t eat away what you have, which is what usually happens. Family is even better if they love you, so make sure you love them.

The best thing about family is that they will sacrifice for you, just as you sacrificed for them while raising them. You want to make sure you aren’t a nuisance, or complainer, or are making yourself unwelcome. You want to be loving.

One of my books—Appaloosa Blues—centers around a ranch family in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon, where the grandfather uses his heart condition to control the rest of the family members. He loves his granddaughters and doesn’t want them marrying the Trahern men, so naturally, the two girls fall in love with the two Trahern brothers.

Their romances have to stay hidden from the old man, as they figure he will have a heart attack if he finds out about them. Being a loving grandfather, he tries to set one up with another young man, the son of a friend, with disastrous consequences. Also, being wise, he knows something is going on by the joy or sorrow he sees on his granddaughter’s faces.

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About Nancy Radke

A USA Today bestselling author, Nancy Radke grew up on a wheat and cattle ranch in SE Washinton State. She attended a one-room country school through the eighth grade. She learned to ride bareback at age 3 (Really! It was a common practice.) and when she got off or fell off, she would pull her horse's nose to the ground, get on behind its ears, and the horse would lift its head so she could scoot down onto its back. Nancy spent most of her childhood exploring the Blue Mountain trails that bordered the ranchlands. She and a friend once took a trail that turned out to be a two day trip. They always rode with matches and pocket knives, so made camp and returned the next day. These long rides worried her parents, but provided plenty of time to make up stories. Her first novel was set in the Blues, and is entitled APPALOOSA BLUES. TURNAGAIN LOVE was the first one published. It rated a four star review from Affaire de Coeur. Scribes World said "Turnagain Love has some fascinating twists and turns, unexpected complications, and charming scenes." It is light and humorous. Nancy currently has over 30 books written, both modern and western. All her stories are sweet and wholesome.  View website

4 Replies to “Retirement Planning by Nancy Radke #mgtab”

  1. Nancy, that is such good advice. When we bought our latest home in Houston, we had the doorways widened to 36″ just in case the future held some unpleasant surprises. With a lease house we bought, we did the same thing which turned out to be a good decision when it was leased by someone in a wheelchair. I was glad we helped someone find a home that accommodated their needs because so many houses do not.

  2. Right. I didn’t mention it, but I added an elevator instead of putting in stairs. I figured that it only takes one car accident to wheelchair someone. Expensive, but not so much when you add it while building. Now my wheelchair friends can come to see me. I got rid of my car and now go up and down instead of back and forth. I do a lot of online shopping.

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