Everything You Wanted to Know About Wolves

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I had already planned to write NEVER CRY WOLF and was starting to research wolves when I had the opportunity to participate in a Wolf Ecology Workshop in Wisconsin.

There I met a couple of “wolfmen” who resemble my hero, Donovan Wilde. They were dressed in skins wearing mocassin-type boots and head coverings made from a coyote or fox, which included the heads. They taught participants to trek through the Wisconsin snow-covered woods on snow shoes and look for signs of wolves. We learned to re-create wolf prints (I still have mine), and we examined collars and telemetry equipment and learned how they worked.

Here are some fun things I learned about wolves…

A pack consists of an alpha male, an alpha female, biders waiting for an alpha position and dispersers who will leave to try to start a pack of their own. There are also omega males or females, hanging at the back of the pack. Only the alpha male and female mate, but the whole pack takes care of the pups and yearlings.

Wolves can hear sounds at six miles, while humans can hear noises from a mile and a half at the most. If two wolves howl on the same note, one will change octaves and make it sound like three are howling.

What do wolves eat? In Wisconsin, 55% deer, 10% snowshoe hare, 15% beaver, 19% miscellaneous. Wolves hunt in pairs. A wolf can go for a week without eating, then can ingest one third of its body weight and bring it back to the pack. To share. The whole pack returns to the den after hunting to feed the pups. Pups are weaned and leave the den at 6-8 weeks.

DNR (Department of Natural Resources) state trappers trap and collar wolves to determine where they are traveling within a territory. Wisconsin is broken into blocks for volunteers to do howling surveys and tracking. Howling is a research tool, revealing how many wolves there are in a pack as well as their ages.

Wolf traps that are used to catch wolves to collar are set under soil. They consist of a chain and grappling hook and 3 grapples. “Stink bait” or urine from a different pack is used to draw them to the trap, which is checked twice per day. They are modified with metal ‘knobs’ so the trap doesn’t cause injury. The wolf’s paw is larger than its leg bone and therefore it can’t get its leg out of the trap.

A trapped wolf is tranquilized for an hour and a half. Blood samples are taken for genetic and disease testing. The trapper might pull a tooth and split it open to determine age, then collar and tag the animal’s ear. In Wisconsin, they use planes with telemetry to follow and see the wolves below.

A trapper can determine how many wolves are in a pack through their tracks. All wolves will walk in same line down the road. Their front feet are bigger than the back. One of the trappers teaching the workshop said he was able to distinguish nine wolves from one line of prints.

 

The wolf ecology weekend was a really special research event for me since I am a staunch animal advocate. I came away knowing more about how wolves operated in the wild and was able to use some of those details in NEVER CRY WOLF, and later in WOLF MOON. I hope you enjoy Donovan Wilde and his psychic connection to the black wolf that saved him when he was a child lost in the northern woods…

NEVER CRY WOLF is available at Amazon, iBooks, Kobo, BN and Google

https://books.pronoun.com/never-cry-wolf/

Patricia Rosemoor

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Patricia Rosemoor has had 99 novels, 8 publishers and more than 7 million books in print. Patricia writes dangerous love, romantic suspense or paranormal romantic thrillers. Patricia has won a Golden Heart from Romance Writers of America and two Reviewers Choice and two Career Achievement Awards from Romantic Times BOOKreviews, and in her other life, she taught Popular Fiction and Suspense-Thriller Writing at Columbia College Chicago.

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ROMANTIC CONFLICTS Part 2 @PRosemoor #mgtab

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Last month I talked about romantic conflict in romance novels. Here are some conflict don’ts…and some examples of complex conflicts.

Conflict don’ts

•    Don’t have a conflict that can be cleared up with a discussion – that’s a misunderstanding rather than a conflict.

•    Don’t use cliches – an example is once spurned, the heroine would never get involved with another man

•    Don’t use the ‘I hate you but let’s go to bed’ syndrome

•    Or – the hero who is reluctant to commit because he feels he’s not good enough for the heroine

To me, those are examples of weak romantic conflicts and an author can turn them around.

What if the spurned heroine is determined to make the hero run a gauntlet to prove he loves her. He may not know why she’s making prove himself over and over again, but he’s willing to do it to win her heart … until he finds out why. He feels she’s comparing him to a skunk, and nothing she says is going to make him feel better about it. So she’ll have to do something outrageous in return to prove her love for him.

Example of bringing together external and internal conflicts:

Heroine is a historian who has always loved a wonderful old mansion near the lake and is working to get it historical status. Hero is a developer who wants to tear it down to put up a high rise condo. Why do they have their particular points of view? Maybe she comes from a background where her family wanted everything new, didn’t appreciate anything with history, didn’t appreciate her, which made her feel like the odd woman out. She can equate the hero with her family. Maybe the hero has to prove himself to his family, and that condo he’s going to build is his chance. If he gives it up, then he has failed. No matter if they’re honest with each other, that’s not going to end the conflict. They each have to work to make the other person happy/fulfilled, each have to be willing to give something up for the other. Of course what I would do is have the hero decide to give up on the project for her, which makes her feel like she is appreciated for who she is. At the same time, I would have her be willing to give up her fight to get the property historical status. He refuses. And then she would use connections to find him another property for his condo.

Here are some examples from my The McKenna Legacy novels when falling in love for a McKenna means putting that person in danger…

Brazen – Siobhan is a branch of the McKennas under a curse. Fall in love, act on that love and put the love interest in mortal danger. So in the past, she broke up with Clay so he wouldn’t die like her father did. And then she married someone else who did die. In the present day story, Clay returns to protect her. And while he still loves her, he’s not willing to fully open himself to her because he doesn’t trust her not to spurn him again.

Deal Breaker – Hailey thinks Bryce marries her strictly for business because he wants money, when in fact, he’s trying to save the family business and the only other way he can do it to sell the Lake Geneva house, which was his late mother’s legacy to her children. He can’t do it. He feels responsible for her disappearance. This is all they have left of her.

Purebred – Cat is divorced from a man who married her for her money and is still trying to take what she has left. Aidan has come from Ireland with his racehorse on her dime, and she starts making comparisons between the two. Also, Aidan was in love with a jockey and she died riding one of his horses. So he convinces himself he won’t put another woman at risk, until dangerous things start happening to Cat.

And more examples from my stories in the three serial novels recently published:

 

Gypsy Magic serial novel: Andrei
Elizabeth’s mother was murdered and Andrei’s father testified against the man convicted of her murder. Now Andrei is trying to prove that man, his cousin, is innocent. In addition, Andrei is cursed by the man’s gypsy mother never to consummate his relationship with any woman.

https://books.pronoun.com/andrei/

 

 

Renegade Magic serial novel: Rico
Rico abandoned the mystical beliefs of his heritage, an obstacle in his relationship with artist Charlotte, who is drawn to the old ways. His disbelief makes her fear they will never mesh. Meditation pulls Charlotte straight into her paintings where she senses the murdering witch following her. Terrified of losing her when she is in a dangerous trance, Rico forces his mind to follow.

https://books.pronoun.com/rico

 

 

New Orleans Magic serial novel: Zachary
Officer Zachary Doucet arrives at a murder scene‒‒the victim another voodoo ceremony participant‒‒only to face his ex-partner Detective Rebecca Romero. Zachary intends to clear his half-brother Jordan. From something he did in the past to get his arrest, Rebecca fears he’ll do anything to free Jordan. With Rebecca a straight arrow and Zachary a maverick, is there hope for a future together?

https://books.pronoun.com/zachary

Patricia Rosemoor

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Patricia Rosemoor has had 99 novels, 8 publishers and more than 7 million books in print. Patricia writes dangerous love, romantic suspense or paranormal romantic thrillers. Patricia has won a Golden Heart from Romance Writers of America and two Reviewers Choice and two Career Achievement Awards from Romantic Times BOOKreviews, and in her other life, she taught Popular Fiction and Suspense-Thriller Writing at Columbia College Chicago.

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Binging on Media

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The publishing industry isn’t the only media that is going through a huge transition. The way we watch television is, as well.

There are always dead spots in network programming. The winter holidays. The transitions before and after summer. It used to be you couldn’t watch anything new in the summer, but a half dozen years ago (maybe more), new series launched in the summer, especially on cable. Some series even have two seasons.

But we’ve gone way beyond that now. Or at least some of us have. Now we binge watch.
I can’t remember if I started with Downton Abbey or with Homeland. I was late to the party with both, but writer friends online kept talking about these two series, and I finally had to check them out for myself. I caught the first two seasons of Downton Abbey right before season three launched. It never occurred to me that I would watch any series, even a short season, in a weekend. And that’s exactly what I did. I couldn’t get enough of it. The characters drove the story and me with them. Same with Homeland.

It never occurred to me that binge watching would become a regular habit. Until…
Last year at this time, I got Netflix. I’d had Netflix before, renting DVDs. When Netflix went to streaming, I dropped it. I thought who would want to watch the old movies they were trying to sell. And then they started producing new series.

Orange is the New Black sucked me in right as season two started. So I watched two seasons in about two weeks. And then there was Breaking Bad, a requirement for a workshop in California with Story guru Robert McKee. My writing group took the workshop together after watching Breaking Bad together. However it did take us half a year to watch 62 episodes. I’ve tried various other series, and if I like them, I watch the whole season(s), though not necessarily in a weekend or two.

Note that network television is now experimenting. Aquarius is a new summer series that started a few weeks ago, but the day after the series started, all 13 episodes appeared on my Tivo. Not recorded, but a click will stream an episode from On Demand. The Tivo has changed, as well, because I created a OnePass for Orange is the New Black, and it, too, shows up on My Shows and I can stream them from there.

I’ve also had Amazon Prime for a couple of years and have occasionally watched movies. Now Amazon is producing new content. Bosch, based on the Michael Connelly novel character, was a natural for me. I watched the 10 episode season in one weekend. Then I started thinking about how this binge watching phenomenon related to reading books.

Think about how many people you know who get hooked on a series. And if they come to that series late in the game like I did with Downton Abbey and Homeland, they may want to read all the books currently in that series.

SEE.ME3TELL.ME.2TOUCH.ME.3

 

 

 

 

 

When I started The McKenna Legacy, it was just three books, but they were so popular, I was asked to continue the series. Then readers asked how many books I intended to write, because they wanted to get them all before starting to read. Which means they were binge reading. At the time I didn’t have an answer, but my plan was to write nine books — three sets of three McKenna siblings — but then I was asked to write even more, so there are fourteen in total.

Binge reading happened to me when I discovered the Karen Marie Moning Fever series. I read the whole series one after the other because I needed to know how it all came together.

Has it happened to you? Fess up. Do you binge read or binge watch television? What are your favorites?

****

 

Also, the award winning authors of The Authors’ Billboard have an exciting new contest going on for the month of July. Entering is easy, just go to

http://woobox.com/4zamd6

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Like our page and enter your email address. That’s it!

Good Luck!!!

Patricia Rosemoor

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Patricia Rosemoor has had 99 novels, 8 publishers and more than 7 million books in print. Patricia writes dangerous love, romantic suspense or paranormal romantic thrillers. Patricia has won a Golden Heart from Romance Writers of America and two Reviewers Choice and two Career Achievement Awards from Romantic Times BOOKreviews, and in her other life, she taught Popular Fiction and Suspense-Thriller Writing at Columbia College Chicago.

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The McKenna Legacy

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SEE.ME3To My Darling Grandchildren,

I leave you my love and more. Within thirty-three days of your thirty-third birthday-enough time to know what you are about-you will have in your grasp a legacy of which your dreams are made. Dreams are not always tangible things, but more often are born in the heart. Act selflessly in another’s behalf, and my legacy will be yours.

Your loving grandmother,

Moira McKenna

***

TELL.ME.2Readers often ask me how I got the inspiration for The McKenna Legacy, a romantic suspense series with quirky paranormal elements—prophetic dreams, premonitions, the ability to communicate with animals—that speak to the Irish in the stories. Oddly enough, the idea came from family—McKenna is a family name through my late maternal grandmother. Two family members, a second cousin and an uncle by marriage, decided to do a family tree at about the same time. Both sent me copies, one complete with photos of older relatives, most of whom I’d never met. But the sense of family I got from them morphed into a series idea.

SEE ME IN YOUR DREAMS, the first book in The McKenna Legacy, begins in Ireland. Keelin McKenna inherited her grandmother’s ability to dream through other’s eyes and becomes haunted by what is happening to a teenager, which sets up the suspense element of the story. With St. Patrick’s Day right around the corner, I’ve put that first book on a 99 cent special through March 17. And I’m participating in a St. Patrick’s Day giveaway at Just Romantic Suspense from March 11-13. http://www.justromanticsuspense.com/p/jrs-holiday-giveaway.html

TOUCH.ME.3    Interestingly enough, my Intrigue editor had asked me for a mini-series. I gave her the first three books, which included TELL ME NO LIES and TOUCH ME IN THE DARK, but I had plans for nine books total, heroes or heroines being children of three siblings born in Ireland who had split. The idea of the first three books was to heal the breach in the family and bring everyone back together again. But all nine books would keep to Moira’s legacy which combine love with danger.

The editor didn’t seem interested in continuing, so I went on to other projects. And then was asked to do a couple more McKennas, then more, then another branch of the family when I’d written all nine. In total, there are 14 books in The McKenna Legacy series. It has been a couple of years, and I’m thinking of picking up where I left off with more McKennas. The holiday has the McKenna effect on me.

SEE ME IN YOUR DREAMS 99 cents through St. Patrick’s Day

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Find Patricia Rosemoor at:

Website: PatriciaRosemoor.com

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Patricia Rosemoor

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Patricia Rosemoor has had 99 novels, 8 publishers and more than 7 million books in print. Patricia writes dangerous love, romantic suspense or paranormal romantic thrillers. Patricia has won a Golden Heart from Romance Writers of America and two Reviewers Choice and two Career Achievement Awards from Romantic Times BOOKreviews, and in her other life, she taught Popular Fiction and Suspense-Thriller Writing at Columbia College Chicago.

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