How to be a Cool Cat: Then and Now

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

First, let me say, by *Cool Cat* I mean hip, as opposed to arctic–as  in freezing temperatures. Myren, my chauffeur, thought I should mention this since he felt that few would associate me with anything to do with hip. We had a loud long discussion about this, but I won’t bore you with those details.

How would I know about cool? you ask. (Or I should say, Myren asked this very thing. Numerous times.)

Let’s say, I’ve had the chance to observe many of the cool-as-in-hip over the years. Sometimes I’ve even acted cool myself.

Why should I care? you ask. Everyone wants to be cool, I say. What planet are you from?

Here are my coolest handy hints!

Top 6 ways to be a Cool Cat:

  1. Don’t use the term Cool Cat unless you travel back in time to the 50s and join a band of beatniks. Or unless you’re referring to the old cartoon character based on beatniks from the 50s. Come to think of it, those beatniks were really cool cats.
  2. Wear a beret. Preferably black.
  3. Never smile.
  4. Always wear sunglasses.
  5. Get some bongo drums.
  6. Wear black. Or black & white stripes.

Okay, so if you don’t want to be a beatnik from the 50s, maybe you can skip the bongos.

Now you’re asking “Can I be a Cool Cat in the 21st century without imitating some ancient-times goth-looking characters?”

Sure, I say.

Top 6 Ways to be a 21st Century Cool Cat:

  1. Change out the beret for a baseball cap or knit cap.
  2. Wear very baggy pants or very tight pants.
  3. Get a tattoo or 4 or 5. Large and colorful ones.
  4. Grow a beard if you’re a guy and enhance your hair and nails if you’re a woman.
  5. Change out the bongo drums for the latest mobil with at least 479 apps.
  6. Join a gym. Muscles are in.

Keep the sunglasses. Shades are forever cool.

 

Stephanie Queen
About USA Today Bestselling Author Stephanie Queen
A romantic at heart and a writer by nature, Stephanie Queen has the enthusiastic soul of a cheerleader. So of course she loves creating stories where the good guys always win. Although she’s lost count of all the jobs she had before she settled on being a Novelist, her favorite was selling cookies as a Keebler Elf. She is a graduate of UConn (go Huskies!) and Harvard U and lives in New Hampshire with her family, her cat, Kitty, and her (real or imagined?) chauffeur, Myren.
SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

A Bride for Prince Paul on Kindle Scout

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

My Kindle Scout campaign for A Bride for Prince Paul has launched.

Here is the URL: https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/37BZQ1K8SCMK7

May I count on your nomination? If I get selected you will receive a free copy of this delightful book set in Paris and Rensy Island in the Channels.

After you enter your nomination and rating, please leave your name in the comments or email me at mona@monarisk.com To thank you, I will gift you a copy of one of my books from the Holiday Babies Series.

Here is the URL: https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/37BZQ1K8SCMK7

To Nominate me, click HERE

A Bride for Prince Paul (Modern Princes Series Book 1) by MONA RISK

She can’t abandon her patients for his crown!

To please his dying grandfather and protect his country’s autonomy, Prince Paul of Rensy Island must marry an American doctor, descendant of a Rensian princess. Paul, a confirmed bachelor, agrees to meet Amy incognito during her vacation in Paris. Although her career and ex-boyfriend are major interferences, attraction sizzles between Amy and her ‘driver’, but the rumor of her engagement to ‘Prince’ Paul outrages her. Can he convince her that he loves her, in spite of his lies by omission?

I wrote this story while cruising the British Isles. The setting of the book was inspired by the quaint Guernsey island, an island in the Channels.

 

 

 

The guide explained that the residents of Guernsey speak English and French, don’t pay taxes and enjoy free medical care for children under seven and seniors over seventy. The island has alternatively belonged to England and France, and is now part of the British Commonwealth. The ruler is a governor and the constitution states that in case of problems the island would revert to England.

I loved the romantic setting. My muse immediately replace the governor with a prince, just like Monaco or Luxembourg, both in Europe, and my imagination changed their constitution–the heir to the throne must be married. The ruling prince is old and dying, and his grandson is a handsome businessman and playboy who enjoys his freedom and his work. But grandpa worries about the future of his country and summons his grandson!

All of this played in my head while I was in the bus touring the island and visiting the landmarks.

Imagine if Kate Middleton (Dr. Amy in my story) were an American doctor, dedicated to her career and her patients.

 

 

What if Prince William (Prince Paul in my story) wanted to make sure his future wife will love him for himself and not for his crown?

What if he decided to act as her driver and guide, in Paris, to get to know her better?

What if their attraction turns into passionate love?

What about her medical career and her patients?

What if the paparazzi haunt them at every turn? What if the tabloid magazines spoil everything? What if…what if…what if…

 

Mona Risk
New York Times and USA Today Bestselling Author, Mona Risk, received an Outstanding Achiever Award from Affaire de Coeur Magazine. She’s a two time winner of Best Contemporary Romance of the Year from Readers Favorite; a winner of Best Romance Novel of the Year from Preditors & Editors Readers Poll; and an EPIC Award finalist.
Mona Risk’s name has often been posted on the Amazon.com 100 Most Popular Authors in Romance list, and her books have garnered: Top Pick, Outstanding Read, Sweetheart of the Week, and Best Book of the Week from various reviewers, and received two mentions in Publisher’s Weekly.
Mona lives in South Florida and has traveled to more than eighty countries on business or vacation. She writes contemporary romances, medical romance, romantic suspense, and paranormal fantasy. Sprinkled with a good dose of humor, her stories are set in the fascinating places she visited or more simply at home.
If you like to travel and love to read, come and enjoy her international romances. Meet the spirited heroines and special heroes who share irresistible chemistry in stories that simmer with emotion.
 View website
SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Small Towns; Big Hearts

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Flynn_GodBlessTXI spent yesterday fighting the urban traffic snarls that occur daily in Houston and other large cities. At the end of the day, exhausted, I realized traffic was another of the many attractions small towns hold for me.

In a small town, there are no traffic jams. No rush hours twice a day with each one taking 2-3 hours. No rain induced “domino effect” rear end crashes.

If there is an accident, someone will pull over to see if they can help or call your family to come to the scene. People in small town have big hearts.

Ah! Small Towns

I love small towns with businesses decorated to express the owner’s opinions like the store above. Because I grew up in a small town, I know a lot about these unique communities — the social structure, the economics, and, most importantly, the people who live in small towns.

Favorite Book Setting

A small town is my favorite place to set a story, and many of my contemporary romance novels are set in small towns. Small towns are like characters in a book–they give color and depth to the story.

Most of the time, I live in a townhouse in Houston, but on the weekends, my husband and I head to the country to our house there. The sky is bigger it seems in the country. Sitting on the back porch at night with a million brilliant stars above and the quiet sounds of a coyote howl gives a sensation of tranquility.

I subscribe to the weekly newspaper in the town nearest our country house. That small town, with a population of 664, is the largest of the nearby towns. My goodness. That makes my hometown where I grew up look huge with its boasted population of 5,000+. (I also subscribe to my hometown’s weekly newspaper.)

Homage to The Tonight Show Kings

When Jay Leno and Johnny Carson, the kings of The Tonight Show,  read the unintentionally funny items from newspapers and advertisements sent in from viewers, they had me–and probably most of America–laughing.

Since I subscribe to 2 small town newspapers, I see funny stuff in print all the time. Of course, it’s not supposed to be funny!

I just about fell out of my chair when I read in one of those papers about the man who planted a bomb in his wife’s car. No, that wasn’t funny, but the comment from the Sheriff’s Department was.

When the small town reporter asked the Deputy about the explosive device, the Deputy earnestly replied: “The explosive device did not explode, and we can’t tell whether it was homemade or not.”

Excuse me? Homemade or not? Are there stores that actually sell car bombs? I mean, aren’t all car bombs, by their very nature, homemade?

Life Is Just Different

The following is a perfect example of rural Texas life in the oil patch. I don’t think you’ll see a sign like this in the city.

Sign on a local restaurant: “We deliver to surrounding oil fields.”

Now that’s small town.

Life really is different in rural and small town America. The people seem more patient and kinder. It’s almost as if there are stock characters, and every town is required to have its requisite number of them.

The pace is definitely more relaxed. My Romantic Comedy series Texas One Night Stands is all about small town life where you sneeze and someone across town says, “God bless you.”

Sheriff’s Deputy Susannah Quinn, the heroine of The Trouble With Love, that closeness is suffocating. She’s tired of the town knowing everything about “poor little Susannah” and plans to escape as soon as she can. The only thing standing in her way is a tall, dark, and too darn sexy for her own peace of mind FBI Special Agent.

RJAIn the second book of the series, Romeo and Judy Anne, high school principal Judy Anne Palmer is tired of being up on a pedestal of respectability. She kicks over the traces one night in Dallas.

When her one-night lover shows up in her hometown, she’s afraid her night of passion will end up being the biggest scandal her little Texas town has ever seen.

Both of these books, along with my others, are available at most ebook sellers; audio book editions are at Audible.com and iTunes.

Your Opinion

Do you like small towns as a book setting? If not, what’s your favorite setting? Leave a comment with your email address, and I’ll send you a coupon code for a free copy of The Trouble With Love.


Joan Reeves writes sexy Contemporary Romance Novels–available at most ebook sellers. (Audio editions available at Audible, and iTunes.) All of Joan’s books have the same underlying premise: “It’s never too late to live Happily Ever After.”

Joan lives her Happily Ever After with her hero, her husband, in the Lone Star State.

Readers, sign up for Joan’s Mailing List/Free NL . Writers, subscribe to WritingHacks, Joan’s free NL for authors. Connect Online with Joan: Blog * Facebook * Google+  * Twitter * YouTube.

Joan Reeves
NY Times and USA Today bestselling author Joan Reeves makes her home in the Lone Star State with her hero, her husband.

They have 4 children who think they are adults and a ghost dog, all the ingredients for a life full of love and warmed by laughter.

Joan lives the philosophy that is the premise of her romance novels: “It’s never too late to live happily ever after.”

 View website

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Take Time for Simple Pleasures #Summer #Family #mgtab @jacqbiggar

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

picnic-745754_1280

 

One of my favorite things to do in the summer is to pack an impromptu picnic lunch and go for a drive with DH until we find that perfect spot to while away the afternoon.

Sometimes I think we get so caught up in the hectic pace of everyday life we let the simple pleasures go by the wayside.

Funny thing though, looking back on my life it’s those sort of days I remember the most.

Rising early and driving deep into the forest to my dad’s favorite fishing spot, then walking through the bog, losing my shoe and having him rescue it for me. 🙂 Catching a creel full of trout and grayling and then stopping for lunch along the riverbank.

Wicker_creel

Attribution: By Sobebunny – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7274675

 

Or going for a drive up and over the Great Divide to pick raspberries with my aunt who had a condition that had us kids giggling, but must have been frustrating and possibly dangerous for her. You see, she had a condition where she would be talking and all the sudden she’d fall asleep mid-sentence! When she woke up, she’d continue the conversation even though it might be fifteen minutes later.

 

raspberry-397940_640

 

One of my favorite times was a picnic into the Cadomin mountains with my grandparents. My grandpa was sick with cancer at the time and wouldn’t see the next summer, but for that day, life was good.

 

spring-276014_640

 

Don’t forget to take the time to enjoy simple pleasures, they’re the ones that matter the most.

Jacquie Biggar

http://jacqbiggar.com

Jacquie Biggar
Lives in paradise along the west coast of Canada with her her husband, daughter, and grandson. Loves reading, writing, and flower gardening. Spoils her German shepherd, Annie and calico cat, Harley.
And can’t function without coffee.
View website
SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

5 Steps to Being More Gracious

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

GraciousQuoteby Stephanie Queen

Like a Queen – but not me, not this Queen. I’m only writing about the 5 steps because I need to take them myself. I can be the most un-gracious queen or queen-named person EVER at times. So that’s why I made it my business to figure out how to change all that.

Gracious:  pleasantly kind, benevolent, and courteous; characterized by good taste, comfort, ease

According to expert Arthur Dobrin D.S.W. in his Psychology Today article, “Gracious people are kind and their behavior is characterized by tact. Graciousness may be superficial, but sometimes what is on the surface is good enough.”

I want to be gracious. I should be gracious. Or at least more gracious. But is it possible? I gracious heartsay YES! I looked into it and here are FIVE EASY STEPS that I found to help. It’s helping me (even Myren, my chauffeur and chief proponent of this research and behavioral change experiment, is surprised at the mild improvement). It works best in limited time frame social situations–like when you’re out among the subjects–er, I mean people, at a particular social event. Like a wedding or a book signing.

Five Steps to Being Gracious:

  1. Prepare: By this, I mean mental preparation. Tell yourself, repeatedly and often, that you intend to be gracious, before you step into the room. Look in the mirror when you tell yourself this. Adopting the attitude takes time. Let it seep in.
  2. Smile: And mean it. Look in the mirror when you smile. Your job as the gracious one is to make other people comfortable. You want everyone in the room to feel at ease and happy. Look happy. Make them feel it.
  3. Prepare: By this, I mean have some lines ready. If you’re like me, you’re not necessarily quick with a pithy reply–or at least not one that is gracious or even somewhat nice. (Sometimes you/I may even be sarcastic or snarky.) So if you have a few NICE lines ready for an unexpected awkward moment, you’ll be ready. For example: Someone asks how you like their new dress/hairdo/furniture/etc. You aren’t enthusiastic/you think it’s hideous, but before you let the awkward moment take over and communicate your thoughts before a word comes out of your mouth, you need to jump in with a ready answer. You say, for instance, “Very interesting/different/provoking/trendy/stylish.” Better yet, give them a compliment on something else. If a woman asks about her hair style you say, “I love the color of your hair it’s so flattering, it makes your eyes look gorgeous” and don’t stop, keep going until she’s invisiblecrownforgotten that she asked you about something else.
  4. Listen. Do not jump in with a word about yourself or your opinion. Not until/unless you are asked. This takes a tremendous amount of willpower and concentration for me. I literally need to bite my tongue. And then I need to pretend I’m not in pain as the speakers drones on–er, I mean continues unabated. Nod, smile and ask interested sounding questions if you must speak. If asked, say something funny. Do not be serious (unless there’s a death or something horrible).
  5. Do NOT say one single negative word. About anything or anyone to anyone. This includes disagreeing with anyone on matters of politics or religion if the subjects arise. You don’t need to agree with others, but you should say that you understand/acknowledge their view/point. Of course you have opinions, but no one needs to know about them. Not here, not now. This is another of those VERY difficult to accomplish practices for me to adhere to. But if we’re not attending a political rally or a debate, we can save our (my sometimes too strong) opinions.

Now you’re saying to yourself, “Gee, SQ, this sounds like we’ll have the most boring time ever at this event.” But that doesn’t necessarily need to be the case. You can be witty. You can compliment people. You can tell intriguing stories when called on to speak about yourself. Prepare yourself by thinking this stuff up ahead of time (see above).

It all starts with attitude and intention. And practice. The more people you don’t know, the more gracious you need to be. The more familiar you are with people, the more automatic it should be–but it’s easy to let your guard down with familiar people. That’s when you should practice.

Of course, this is all for social settings. When you’re at home with your familiars, you can let your hair down (although Myren, my chauffeur wishes I wouldn’t). That’s when the crown comes off and you can share your opinions. But remember, even with our closest friends and family, it never hurts to be gracious, to always want to make them feel comfortable and good.

Here’s to adopting the Gracious Attitude.

Stephanie Queen
About USA Today Bestselling Author Stephanie Queen
A romantic at heart and a writer by nature, Stephanie Queen has the enthusiastic soul of a cheerleader. So of course she loves creating stories where the good guys always win. Although she’s lost count of all the jobs she had before she settled on being a Novelist, her favorite was selling cookies as a Keebler Elf. She is a graduate of UConn (go Huskies!) and Harvard U and lives in New Hampshire with her family, her cat, Kitty, and her (real or imagined?) chauffeur, Myren.
SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

I Dream In Chocolate

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

chcolate strawberries

 

A little over a week ago I did a blog on #gratitude and my experience with Parkinson’s over on the #RSSOS blog I also blog on.

I can’t speak to how others experience Parkinson’s, only on my own experience. Right now I have a slight tremor and that’s about it. It’s beginning to seem it may stay like that for quite awhile and I appreciate that, I truly do.

I will say, however, I think you get treated differently as a patient, when you’re older. I say this, because, besides giving birth, my only other experience with being injured and the health care system, happened over 20 years ago.

I was hit driver’s side, head on by a garbage truck coming around the corner who lost control and came onto my lane going about 45 mph. The front of my car, a Cricket if I remember correctly, crunched down like a thin tin can, until it hit something around the wheel, or close to it.

The truck stopped, everything shuddered and it continued forward. The window shattered into a zillion small pieces held together, by what seemed afterwards to be something like the mac-tac we had used to cover our schoolbooks as a child. It then wrapped around my head. The seatbelt shoulder restraint gave way and it felt as if my body was thrown sideways. One hip hit the gear shift and my right arm seemed to turn into spaghetti, allowing me to touch the car door on the other side briefly, while maintaining a death grip on the steering wheel. Thankfully the car, along with me, was thrown free from the garbage truck.

I was extremely lucky since I walked out of it. But I didn’t escape unscathed. I had constant migraines for months afterwards along with neck and back problems that have continued over the years. Still, I was lucky. I survived and was able to start a family and, basically, have a life.

So what does that have to do with Parkinson’s ? We’ll skip over the fact that the areas of my body most affected by Parkinson’s are the same areas injured most during the accident. The big difference is doctors and therapists assumed I would recover and lead a normal life.

The ER doctor referred me to a physiotherapist that worked outside the hospital, so he ‘could push me harder.’ The physiotherapist’s mantra seemed to be, “I’ve worked on football players that have played football with a broken neck. You can do it.” I was worried about driving because I had constant headaches and felt dizzy sometimes. “Keep driving,”” I was told. If you give up you’ll stop trying and it will be harder to recover. Out of respect for my fellow drivers I wouldn’t follow that advice now. I worried about mixing up words and was told it was within normal limits and just act as if I’d never been injured.

It felt as if I was in some weird type of bubble, divorced from real life. Somewhere I heard of cervical fusion operations which seemed like a great idea at the time. Not so fast. No way was anyone going to do that surgery on me until at least two years of constant, unstoppable pain, that stopped me from doing pretty well anything.

Fortunately, within a year I was much better. And at this stage in my life I don’t think anyone would suggest I have a neck operation.

Parkinson’s was different. I think it took two years before the doctor stopped asking if my balance was off, if I felt dizzy. No, maybe sometimes? Did I drool yet and a pack of other questions that made me go, “God no,” and wonder if I could just shoot myself now. Truly, it wasn’t a future I wanted to think about.

So I focused on my chocolate mysteries and a world filled with chocolate. Maybe it was a cop out but I couldn’t see where focusing on my doctor’s vision would help anything at all. I pictured my heroine, Maxine. In her mid-twenties, she’s given up a career in banking to follow her dreams. I visualized a chocolate shop filled with chocolate delights. I saw her catering events

Maxine

in interesting locals and I pictured Heath, her sidekick along with Detective Patrick Shannon, a hot detective who is in and out of her life. I figured if I was going to drool it might as well be over something worthwhile.Detective Shannon

That doesn’t mean I ignored my illness. I read everything I could about it and took some of the medications my doctor suggested. When I questioned him about others he couldn’t give me a good, concrete reason to take them and there were some pretty big downsides. I asked him about yoga and dance but he really didn’t know anything. I did yoga for years for my back, though, so except for a period to heal my rotator cuff shoulder, I kept doing it. Then I added dance exercise classes. Because I enjoy them and I can.

Some of what I’ve learned helped me come up with a medical romantic suspense series which I’m working on now. But even things inspired by actual experiences won’t necessarily be recognizable. That’s what makes fiction interesting. It’s not bound by the rules of normal life.

To share some of Maxines favorite chocolate recipes, click on the booklet.

recipeBook (1)

The latest book in my Death by Chocolate series is Soul Mates. Click on the cover for further information.

Soul Mates Cover

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

The Secret/Glamorous Life of a Romance Writer by the Secret Stephanie Queen

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

As I sit at my desk…no, I mean, as I lounge on my pink velvet divan, I’m waiting for my agent to call. Any minute the phone shall ring like St. Patricks Cathedral bells chiming and he’ll have the news. The movie studio will want me to play the leading role as the heroine in the new movie version of my latest best selling novel…

SQ and Kitty, the real Queen

SQ and Kitty, the real Queen

This is about when my cat, Kitty, (yes, that’s her name—when you sit around all day making up names for characters, maybe you want to take a wiff on the cat-naming) jumps up on the desk, licks my face and snaps me out of my day-dream.

(L) Stephanie Queen with Kitty (The crown actually belongs to Kitty. I swiped it for the photo.)

But really, the secret to leading the glamorous life is to never, ever actually admit real reality to intrude on your illusion for more than ten minutes at a time—say for instance, the amount of time you might need to run in the grocery store and buy some Pepto Bismol. Once you emerge from the store, with your head held high, your glamorous regal air in tact—and your purchase safely tucked in your Gucci/DB/Coach or other suitable bag (or facsimile thereof—I know of a good flea market) matching designer sunglasses in place, you stroll–and wave as needed–to your waiting car. (so what if there’s no driver waiting in said waiting car—in your minds eye, you get in the back seat, glance out the window for a quick final pose for the paparazzi and then tell the driver “home, James”)

Once home, you resume your position on the Pink Velvet Divan of your imagination and PinkDivanwith your laptop in hand—or on lap—you select a delectable chocolate bon-bon from the box, adjust your diamond encrusted reading glasses–you wear them strictly for fashion and to look like a writer because you don’t really need reading glasses–and take up the story where you left off. Now where was I…Morocco? Paris? Maybe standing in front of Tiffany’s on Fifth Ave waiting… and most importantly dressed to kill and … who was I waiting for?

What is your pink velvet divan idea of the glamorous writing life?

Stephanie Queen is the proud & glamorous owner of Kitty the cat and author of the Beachcomber Investigations romantic detective series. She can be found at StephanieQueen.com or, on Saturday mornings, out searching yard sales for an actual pink velvet divan.
Stephanie Queen
About USA Today Bestselling Author Stephanie Queen
A romantic at heart and a writer by nature, Stephanie Queen has the enthusiastic soul of a cheerleader. So of course she loves creating stories where the good guys always win. Although she’s lost count of all the jobs she had before she settled on being a Novelist, her favorite was selling cookies as a Keebler Elf. She is a graduate of UConn (go Huskies!) and Harvard U and lives in New Hampshire with her family, her cat, Kitty, and her (real or imagined?) chauffeur, Myren.
SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone

Smart Women Sass by Joan Reeves

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone
Old Enough to Know Better by Joan Reeves

Funny, sexy, cougar-licious romance to warm your heart!

Smart women sass and utter statements that are often as amusing as they are profound.

I write romantic comedy and feature a lot of smart-mouth dialogue. Readers often tell me that they laugh out loud at some of the conversations between characters—especially my women characters because they have smart, sassy mouths.

I like writing dialogue, and I work hard to make it humorous. Sometimes it’s witty; sometimes it’s snarky. Sometimes it’s downright funny, and I find myself laughing like a loon as I type away. (My husband just shakes his head if he happens to be passing my office door at that moment.)

A lot of the dialogue in my books is stuff I’d love to say, but never do—because I was full of sass when I was a child. My mother scolded me constantly until I learned to put a filter between my mouth and my brain. Now I smart-off in writing which is more socially acceptable I suppose—and more profitable.

Smart Women Sass

I suppose it’s understandable that I like to collect witty quotations that are amusing. I often write a Sunday “Written Wisdom” post on my blog, SlingWords, using a quotation as inspiration. More often than not, the quotation I select was uttered by some smart—or smartass—woman. I thought I’d share some of my favorite such quotations with you today. (I used some of these to preface each chapter in my older woman-young man romantic comedy Old Enough To Know Better.)

Perhaps you’ll find some of these inspire you or motivate you to succeed. Or maybe they’ll just put a smile on your face. Here are a baker’s dozen of some favorite sassy words from smart women.

“If high heels were so wonderful, men would be wearing them.” Sue Grafton

“I’m not offended by all the dumb blonde jokes because I know I’m not dumb … and I also know that I’m not blonde.” Dolly Parton

“You see a lot of smart guys with dumb women, but you hardly ever see a smart woman with a dumb guy.” Erica Jong

“I think I alternate between optimism and anxiety. I realize that should either of these get out of hand I would probably need a clever doctor.” Elizabeth Jolley

“Risk! Risk anything! Care no more for the opinion of others, for those voices. Do the hardest thing on earth for you. Act for yourself.” Katherine Mansfield

“A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.” Jane Austen

“I think; therefore, I’m single.” Lizz Winstead

“When women are depressed they either eat or go shopping. Men invade another country.” Elayne Boosler

“Behind every successful man is a surprised woman.” Maryon Pearson

“The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age.” Lucille Ball

“I am a marvelous housekeeper. Every time I leave a man I keep his house.” Zsa Zsa Gabor

“Love is like the measles. The older you get, the worse the attack.” Mary Roberts Rinehart in The Man in Lower Ten.

Last, but not least, a wooden sign hanging on a hook by my desk: “Put your big girl panties on and deal with it!”

That’s right, face your challenges head on and deal with them rather than procrastinate, run, or hide (which I admit I sometimes prefer!).

Wishing you a very good day filled with lots of laughter—and sass!

55973b16083cf-AuthorsBillboardRedWhiteandBooksGiveaway-final-05[1]By the way, there are only a couple of days left to enter the Red White and Books Giveaway!

 

Joan Reeves
NY Times and USA Today bestselling author Joan Reeves makes her home in the Lone Star State with her hero, her husband.

They have 4 children who think they are adults and a ghost dog, all the ingredients for a life full of love and warmed by laughter.

Joan lives the philosophy that is the premise of her romance novels: “It’s never too late to live happily ever after.”

 View website

SHARE:Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on TumblrShare on RedditEmail this to someone